Grain Academy & Museum

<p>The Great Migration West</p><p>All types of people migrated to Western Canada in covered wagons pulled by oxen or horses.  Covered wagons were often called prairie schooners.  A schooner is a boat, and when the prairie grass was very tall, the covered wagon looked like a boat sailing across the grassy plains.  </p><p>They came from Eastern Canada, Europe and the United States. Farmers looking for new land, storekeepers to set up new shops. Carpenters, bakers, blacksmiths, missionaries, shoemakers, artists, lawyers, doctors, and teachers to start a new life.  </p><p>Families packed their wagons with only the items necessary for the five or six month journey.  When it rained, the ground turned muddy and everything sank. When the ground was dry, the wagons kicked up a lot of dust.  The dust would get into the eyes of the pioneers and the animals, and the wagons would have to stop because the trail could not be seen in the dust.</p><p>On a good day a covered wagon would travel about 15 miles.  On a rainy day, the distance travelled might only be 1 mile.  Children did not attend formal school, but while they were on the journey they were constantly learning about flowers, animals, how to fix broken items, how to cook outdoors, and learning how to look after the animals.  If a child was born during the journey, wagons would stop for only one day, then carry on.  During the journey, some people became ill with cholera, malaria, high fevers, aches, and pains.  Some people died and were buried along the trail with a crude grave marker to mark the site.</p><p>Travelling west by covered wagon sounds romantic and adventurous, which it was, but it was also difficult and dangerous.  This is part of the story, for more of the story, visit the Grain Academy & Museum. </p>

The Great Migration West

All types of people migrated to Western Canada in covered wagons pulled by oxen or horses.  Covered wagons were often called prairie schooners.  A schooner is a boat, and when the prairie grass was very tall, the covered wagon looked like a boat sailing across the grassy plains.  

They came from Eastern Canada, Europe and the United States. Farmers looking for new land, storekeepers to set up new shops. Carpenters, bakers, blacksmiths, missionaries, shoemakers, artists, lawyers, doctors, and teachers to start a new life.  

Families packed their wagons with only the items necessary for the five or six month journey.  When it rained, the ground turned muddy and everything sank. When the ground was dry, the wagons kicked up a lot of dust.  The dust would get into the eyes of the pioneers and the animals, and the wagons would have to stop because the trail could not be seen in the dust.

On a good day a covered wagon would travel about 15 miles.  On a rainy day, the distance travelled might only be 1 mile.  Children did not attend formal school, but while they were on the journey they were constantly learning about flowers, animals, how to fix broken items, how to cook outdoors, and learning how to look after the animals.  If a child was born during the journey, wagons would stop for only one day, then carry on.  During the journey, some people became ill with cholera, malaria, high fevers, aches, and pains.  Some people died and were buried along the trail with a crude grave marker to mark the site.

Travelling west by covered wagon sounds romantic and adventurous, which it was, but it was also difficult and dangerous.  This is part of the story, for more of the story, visit the Grain Academy & Museum.

Posted 92 weeks ago

How Things Have Changed!

In the early 1900s there were over 5700 grain elevators in Western Canada. Today there are just over 300.  The old style wooden elevators have given way to modern cement and steel structures.  Combines worth a half million dollars have replaced the wooden flail for threshing grain.  In 1985 85% of Canada’s grain elevators & export facilities were owned by farmers … today that number is less than 1%.

This is one of the stories we share at the Grain Academy & Museum.  There are many other stories, like what food comes from wheat, oats, barley, flax and canola?  The story of early homesteaders who came to Western Canada from Europe, Eastern Canada and the United States, by wagon before railways were built in the later 1800,s, and later by train, with a dream to establish homesteads as they searched for a better way of life.

For these early pioneers, the challenges were difficult and the work was hard. In some cases homesteaders were not able to achieve their dreams and had to turn to another profession to make a living, or return to their place of origin.

The stories are rich, and are brought alive through working models, videos, story telling and artifacts from the past.  Stop by and visit … we would love to host you.

Posted 93 weeks ago

Guest & Teachers Remarks

Thorough tour, thanks!  A ton of intormation, a pleasure to learn.  Regular visitor, always of immense interest & brings back memories.  A little gem on Stampede Park.  Shows off agricultre!  Calgary’s best kept secret, the Grain Academy & Museum located on the Plus 15 between the LRT and the BMO Centre at Stampede Park.

Posted 93 weeks ago